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If you need help or advice about a dog you are retiring then this is the place for you.

Should you be getting a Greyhound as a pet


Kevin Wright
Australia
(Verified User)
Posts 5559
Dogs 1 / Races 1

19 Aug 2020 23:21


 (4)
 (0)


Should you be getting a Greyhound as a pet ?
Before you go any further, you need to give serious thought to whether or not you are ready for the responsibility of any dog. Please consider the following:
Is your job secure?
Are you likely to be transferred? Caught up in downsizing? Even if your job is secure, if you work very long hours a cat might be better for you.
If you rent a house or apartment, are you positive having a dog is allowed?
If its allowed is there a size/weight limit of the dog?
Is your marriage/relationship on solid ground?
This is a tough question but for the sake of the animal you must ask it yourself. Adoption agencies and animal shelters are full of pets who are the unwitting victims of divorce.
How old are you?
If you are either on the younger side or the older side, there are some things you should think about:
For those in their late teens, you are in an age when your life can take many unexpected turns. You may decide on college, or travelling or start a family owning a dog might prevent you from pursuing some of your dreams. For those in their seventies, now that you retired, a dog can be a wonderful addition to your life. If you are senior and decide to get a dog you should not get a too young one. Many pets over the age of six are in excellent health, need less exercise, and are already well-served with the ins and outs a being a good companion.
How are you fixed financially?
The fee for adopting a Greyhound is nothing compared to the lifetime of expenses you will incur.
What a greyhound is, and what it isn't
Did you know that all purebred dogs were developed for a purpose? Very few breeds (with the exeption of many of the toy breeds) were created to what we call a pet. Some were developed to serve a purpose as guarding, herding or some specialized form of hunting. The Greyhound's purpose was, and is, to run in packs after prey ranging in size from rabbits to deer. With few exceptions Greyhounds will not guard or protect and, while in pursuit, they will not come if called. Most Greyhounds prefer not to swim, fetch or jump in the air for a Frisbee - it just isn't in their genes. What is in their genes is their size (large), their shape (aerodynamic) and their instinct to run in cooperation withh other Greyhounds. Combine this with the chasing-reinforcement training that racing dogs receive in their formative years, and you have a large, streamlined, mild-mannered dog who can never be allowed off-lead in fenced areas. Does this sound like the dog for you?
Why greyhounds cannot run loose
It is impossible to put to much emphasis on this point. There are some people who adopt who think that their dog is somehow different and can be trusted not to run away. Here are some facts that will illustrate why allowing a Greyhound to run free is dangerous idea. Greyhounds are among the fastest land mammals they run about twice as fast as a human sprinter. Therefore catching a running Greyhound is impossible.
Greyhounds have been bred for literally thousands of years for one thing: speed. If you think an obedience course is enough to wipe out eons of genetics and training, then you are deluding yourself and risking your dogs life.
Greyhounds are companions, not guard dogs
If you are looking for a dog that will double duty as both a pet and a protector perhaps you should investigate into other breeds. Greyhounds are very unagressive dogs (remember, they were created to cooperate) and the vast majority of them will not even bark when they see a stranger approaching the house.


Daryl Barrett
Australia
(Verified User)
Posts 792
Dogs 0 / Races 0

20 Aug 2020 04:54


 (0)
 (0)


G'day Kevin, an excellent post mate,a few particular,but very pertinent points you mention are ;
" What a greyhound is,& what a greyhoung isn't ",i have always said & believed that once you know what a greyhound isn't, then you can learn & know what a greyhound is.
"Greyhounds are not guard dogs ", ( I did have a little laugh though,remembering a dog that i once had a dog by Gliders Son,his owner came around to see him,but i warned him not to go out into yard where he was emptying out,because he was pretty aggressive towards,what he thought were intruders - i always knew before i saw them,if someone was hanging around so to speak,he was very protective of me & "his" property,-,anyway,the owner decided that " he'll be right Daryl,i own him ",so he went out against my advice.Well, the next thing i hear is "Rocky " barking & snarling at his owner,then his owner bolting into the house trembling,white as a ghost & barely able to talk,until,in a quivering voice saying,the rotten bastard went for me, !!,ohh bugger me,i couldn't stop laughing,in the end my stomach was so bloody sore from laughing,it wasn't funny anymore.Needless to say,poor old Keith never went out to see his dog again without me,,( bloody hell,i'm still laughing as i am telling you about it,ha ha ha ha ,ahh geeez!).
But as you say mate most are just big,beautiful aloof ,& gentle dogs.Maybe you should send you're post to all adoption programs as a guide to help people if they are thinking about adopting a greyhound.
Kevin Wright wrote:

Should you be getting a Greyhound as a pet ?
Before you go any further, you need to give serious thought to whether or not you are ready for the responsibility of any dog. Please consider the following:
Is your job secure?
Are you likely to be transferred? Caught up in downsizing? Even if your job is secure, if you work very long hours a cat might be better for you.
If you rent a house or apartment, are you positive having a dog is allowed?
If its allowed is there a size/weight limit of the dog?
Is your marriage/relationship on solid ground?
This is a tough question but for the sake of the animal you must ask it yourself. Adoption agencies and animal shelters are full of pets who are the unwitting victims of divorce.
How old are you?
If you are either on the younger side or the older side, there are some things you should think about:
For those in their late teens, you are in an age when your life can take many unexpected turns. You may decide on college, or travelling or start a family owning a dog might prevent you from pursuing some of your dreams. For those in their seventies, now that you retired, a dog can be a wonderful addition to your life. If you are senior and decide to get a dog you should not get a too young one. Many pets over the age of six are in excellent health, need less exercise, and are already well-served with the ins and outs a being a good companion.
How are you fixed financially?
The fee for adopting a Greyhound is nothing compared to the lifetime of expenses you will incur.
What a greyhound is, and what it isn't
Did you know that all purebred dogs were developed for a purpose? Very few breeds (with the exeption of many of the toy breeds) were created to what we call a pet. Some were developed to serve a purpose as guarding, herding or some specialized form of hunting. The Greyhound's purpose was, and is, to run in packs after prey ranging in size from rabbits to deer. With few exceptions Greyhounds will not guard or protect and, while in pursuit, they will not come if called. Most Greyhounds prefer not to swim, fetch or jump in the air for a Frisbee - it just isn't in their genes. What is in their genes is their size (large), their shape (aerodynamic) and their instinct to run in cooperation withh other Greyhounds. Combine this with the chasing-reinforcement training that racing dogs receive in their formative years, and you have a large, streamlined, mild-mannered dog who can never be allowed off-lead in fenced areas. Does this sound like the dog for you?
Why greyhounds cannot run loose
It is impossible to put to much emphasis on this point. There are some people who adopt who think that their dog is somehow different and can be trusted not to run away. Here are some facts that will illustrate why allowing a Greyhound to run free is dangerous idea. Greyhounds are among the fastest land mammals they run about twice as fast as a human sprinter. Therefore catching a running Greyhound is impossible.
Greyhounds have been bred for literally thousands of years for one thing: speed. If you think an obedience course is enough to wipe out eons of genetics and training, then you are deluding yourself and risking your dogs life.
Greyhounds are companions, not guard dogs
If you are looking for a dog that will double duty as both a pet and a protector perhaps you should investigate into other breeds. Greyhounds are very unagressive dogs (remember, they were created to cooperate) and the vast majority of them will not even bark when they see a stranger approaching the house.





Chris Houlding
(Verified User)
Posts 925
Dogs 10 / Races 3

20 Aug 2020 06:38


 (1)
 (0)


Kevin = dd youwrite this or is it from some other source.

Tend to agree for the most part however the post says a greyhound can never be let off a lead in a fenced area which is obviously wrong as a fenced aea is exacgly what you need if you are going to let a greyhound off the lead.


Michael Barry
Australia
(Verified User)
Posts 7253
Dogs 26 / Races 9

20 Aug 2020 07:32


 (1)
 (0)


chris houlding wrote:

Kevin = dd youwrite this or is it from some other source.

Tend to agree for the most part however the post says a greyhound can never be let off a lead in a fenced area which is obviously wrong as a fenced aea is exacgly what you need if you are going to let a greyhound off the lead.


its a typo, meant to read unless in a fenced area id say



Kevin Wright
Australia
(Verified User)
Posts 5559
Dogs 1 / Races 1

20 Aug 2020 09:02


 (0)
 (0)


chris houlding wrote:

Kevin = dd youwrite this or is it from some other source.

Tend to agree for the most part however the post says a greyhound can never be let off a lead in a fenced area which is obviously wrong as a fenced aea is exacgly what you need if you are going to let a greyhound off the lead.


I am the copy paste king but i stole it from
HERE
CLICK HERE



Kevin Wright
Australia
(Verified User)
Posts 5559
Dogs 1 / Races 1

20 Aug 2020 09:03


 (0)
 (0)


Michael Barry wrote:

chris houlding wrote:

Kevin = dd youwrite this or is it from some other source.

Tend to agree for the most part however the post says a greyhound can never be let off a lead in a fenced area which is obviously wrong as a fenced aea is exacgly what you need if you are going to let a greyhound off the lead.


its a typo, meant to read unless in a fenced area id say


Micks on the money again ...



Peter Gurry
Australia
(Verified User)
Posts 7680
Dogs 15 / Races 25

20 Aug 2020 15:15


 (1)
 (0)


No doubt Kev your thread post was in response to this article in Wednesday's Melbourne H-Sun 19/8/20, most readers on here would not have seen it.
EXTERNAL LINK
Regrettably there are those out there who don't know the greyhound breed and it only takes one idiot to have their adopted greyhound to throttle a little dog in an off leash area and stuff up all the goood work GAP programs have acheived. Join Dogs Victoria for $90 a year their two locations Bulla and Skye have fenced galloping areas, although muzzle em as I've had idiots enter when my retired blokes are in there, thank god I did. BTW the joints have been closed since March thanks to Chairman Dan's lack of fencing of Hotel quarantines.



Kevin Wright
Australia
(Verified User)
Posts 5559
Dogs 1 / Races 1

20 Aug 2020 23:30


 (0)
 (0)


Peter Gurry wrote:

No doubt Kev your thread post was in response to this article in Wednesday's Melbourne H-Sun 19/8/20, most readers on here would not have seen it.
EXTERNAL LINK
Regrettably there are those out there who don't know the greyhound breed and it only takes one idiot to have their adopted greyhound to throttle a little dog in an off leash area and stuff up all the goood work GAP programs have acheived. Join Dogs Victoria for $90 a year their two locations Bulla and Skye have fenced galloping areas, although muzzle em as I've had idiots enter when my retired blokes are in there, thank god I did. BTW the joints have been closed since March thanks to Chairman Dan's lack of fencing of Hotel quarantines.


Peter

I feel so sorry for the Retired Greyhound they now own in that article.
These stupid fools will have to learn the hard way.

Greyhounds running in Dog Park will result in the death of that Hound these Adopters and foster people need to understand one thing

Never TRUST A GREYHOUND when they are off leash



Kevin Wright
Australia
(Verified User)
Posts 5559
Dogs 1 / Races 1

20 Aug 2020 23:40


 (0)
 (0)


daryl barrett wrote:

G'day Kevin, an excellent post mate,a few particular,but very pertinent points you mention are ;
" What a greyhound is,& what a greyhoung isn't ",i have always said & believed that once you know what a greyhound isn't, then you can learn & know what a greyhound is.
"Greyhounds are not guard dogs ", ( I did have a little laugh though,remembering a dog that i once had a dog by Gliders Son,his owner came around to see him,but i warned him not to go out into yard where he was emptying out,because he was pretty aggressive towards,what he thought were intruders - i always knew before i saw them,if someone was hanging around so to speak,he was very protective of me & "his" property,-,anyway,the owner decided that " he'll be right Daryl,i own him ",so he went out against my advice.Well, the next thing i hear is "Rocky " barking & snarling at his owner,then his owner bolting into the house trembling,white as a ghost & barely able to talk,until,in a quivering voice saying,the rotten bastard went for me, !!,ohh bugger me,i couldn't stop laughing,in the end my stomach was so bloody sore from laughing,it wasn't funny anymore.Needless to say,poor old Keith never went out to see his dog again without me,,( bloody hell,i'm still laughing as i am telling you about it,ha ha ha ha ,ahh geeez!).
But as you say mate most are just big,beautiful aloof ,& gentle dogs.Maybe you should send you're post to all adoption programs as a guide to help people if they are thinking about adopting a greyhound.
Kevin Wright wrote:

Should you be getting a Greyhound as a pet ?
Before you go any further, you need to give serious thought to whether or not you are ready for the responsibility of any dog. Please consider the following:
Is your job secure?
Are you likely to be transferred? Caught up in downsizing? Even if your job is secure, if you work very long hours a cat might be better for you.
If you rent a house or apartment, are you positive having a dog is allowed?
If its allowed is there a size/weight limit of the dog?
Is your marriage/relationship on solid ground?
This is a tough question but for the sake of the animal you must ask it yourself. Adoption agencies and animal shelters are full of pets who are the unwitting victims of divorce.
How old are you?
If you are either on the younger side or the older side, there are some things you should think about:
For those in their late teens, you are in an age when your life can take many unexpected turns. You may decide on college, or travelling or start a family owning a dog might prevent you from pursuing some of your dreams. For those in their seventies, now that you retired, a dog can be a wonderful addition to your life. If you are senior and decide to get a dog you should not get a too young one. Many pets over the age of six are in excellent health, need less exercise, and are already well-served with the ins and outs a being a good companion.
How are you fixed financially?
The fee for adopting a Greyhound is nothing compared to the lifetime of expenses you will incur.
What a greyhound is, and what it isn't
Did you know that all purebred dogs were developed for a purpose? Very few breeds (with the exeption of many of the toy breeds) were created to what we call a pet. Some were developed to serve a purpose as guarding, herding or some specialized form of hunting. The Greyhound's purpose was, and is, to run in packs after prey ranging in size from rabbits to deer. With few exceptions Greyhounds will not guard or protect and, while in pursuit, they will not come if called. Most Greyhounds prefer not to swim, fetch or jump in the air for a Frisbee - it just isn't in their genes. What is in their genes is their size (large), their shape (aerodynamic) and their instinct to run in cooperation withh other Greyhounds. Combine this with the chasing-reinforcement training that racing dogs receive in their formative years, and you have a large, streamlined, mild-mannered dog who can never be allowed off-lead in fenced areas. Does this sound like the dog for you?
Why greyhounds cannot run loose
It is impossible to put to much emphasis on this point. There are some people who adopt who think that their dog is somehow different and can be trusted not to run away. Here are some facts that will illustrate why allowing a Greyhound to run free is dangerous idea. Greyhounds are among the fastest land mammals they run about twice as fast as a human sprinter. Therefore catching a running Greyhound is impossible.
Greyhounds have been bred for literally thousands of years for one thing: speed. If you think an obedience course is enough to wipe out eons of genetics and training, then you are deluding yourself and risking your dogs life.
Greyhounds are companions, not guard dogs
If you are looking for a dog that will double duty as both a pet and a protector perhaps you should investigate into other breeds. Greyhounds are very unagressive dogs (remember, they were created to cooperate) and the vast majority of them will not even bark when they see a stranger approaching the house.


Daryl
Fantastic Story Mate ....Thanks for sharing it .

I received over 50 stitches from a Greyhound fight when separating them ...

I almost had my Marbles fall out of my Knacker Sack... missed by millimeters Daz....

People do not understand when a Greyhound Hits that RED zone they are one of the most Fierce and aggressive dogs on the planet ...

Adoption Foster Groups need to make Sure that the New Owners ensure they never use a Dog Park in Any State and just because its not illegal in NSW does not mean its the right thing to do .

So many new Adopters are very Ignorant to the Greyhounds needs
IMO

PS
My Tip of the week Daz
Never ever feed your Greyhound when Freeballing it on a hot day ...

posts 9