home - to The Greyhound-Database
Home  |  Dog-Search  |  Dogs ID  |  Races  |  Race Cards  |  Coursing  |  Tracks  |  Statistic  |  Testmating  |  Kennels  
 
Facebook
Login  |    |  add_race  |  add_coursing  |  add_dog  |  Membership  |  Advertising  |  Ask the Vet    Help  print pedigree      
TV  |  Active-Sires  |  Sire-Pages  |  Which Sire?  |  Classifieds  |  Auctions  |  Photos  |  Videos  |  Library  |  Adoption  |  Forum  |  About_us  |  Site Usage

Welcome to the Greyhound Knowledge Forum

   

The Greyhound-Data Forum has been created to act as a platform for greyhound enthusiasts to share information on this magnificent animal called a greyhound.

Greyhound-Data reserve the right to remove any post that is off topic, advertisements or opinions they consider to be offensive.

Please read the forum usage manual please note:

If you answer then please try to stay on topic. It's absolutely okay to answer in a broader scope but don't hijack posts by switching to something off topic.

In case you see an insulting post: DO NOT REPLY TO IT!
Use the report button to inform the moderators so that we can delete it.

Read more...

All TopicsFor SaleGD-WebsiteBreedingHealthRacingCoursingRetirementBettingTalkLogin to post
If you need help or advice about a dog you are retiring then this is the place for you.

Bald Thigh Syndrome/Greyhound Alopecia - Surveypage  1 2 

Mel Fraser
Ireland
(Verified User)
Posts 170
Dogs 1 / Races 0

12 Oct 2006 20:28


 (0)
 (0)


I thought some owners of ex-racing greyhounds that are living as pets might be interested in helping with a survey leading to a scientific study of this condition. The Royal Veterinary College wants information on as many pet greyhounds as possible, WHETHER THEY HAVE HAIR LOSS/COAT THINNING OR NOT.

The following request is on the RVC website:

"Greyhound Alopecia
Greyhounds are generally a healthy breed of dog. However, a number of greyhounds develop hair loss or a thinning of the hair coat in certain regions of their body, e.g. thighs, belly, in front of the ears, and tail. The extent of this hair loss or coat thinning can vary from mild to obvious hair loss, involving a large part of the body. The hair loss may be progressive, stable, or wax and wane. The mild forms may not cause any concern, but more marked hair loss may lead to the owner seeking veterinary advice. Additionally, show dogs with this condition are at a disadvantage in the ring.

Little is known about the extent of the problem, the cause, the heritability, the course, the prognosis or effective treatment. Therefore, a survey has been developed to find out how common hair loss/coat thinning is in the greyhound, which body areas are affected, if the problem can be inherited, and which factors are associated with it. A questionnaire has been designed for owners of affected and unaffected greyhounds to investigate this condition. Knowledge gained from the survey will be used to establish the parameters for a more detailed study of the problem. Information about this condition may also help illuminate hair loss problems affecting other dog breeds, e.g. the whippet.

The principal investigators are specialists in veterinary dermatology with an interest in hair loss. The survey is carried out strictly for scientific reasons. Information gained will not be used for breeding, showing or racing of dogs in any way. All data received will be treated with the strictest confidence.

This questionnaire requests detailed information on the greyhound’s background, management, health and any hair loss/coat thinning conditions. Owners should be requested to provide as much information as possible. To obtain accurate figures, it is necessary to obtain information on as many dogs as possible, and on dogs WITH AND WITHOUT hair loss/coat thinning. If a client has more than one greyhound, please have him/her fill out one questionnaire per dog. There is an ‘any other comments’ section or further information can be included on a separate sheet. If the owner can include photographs with the survey, that would be appreciated.

If you would be interested in helping collect information for this study, please contact our clinical trials nurse, Frances Gaudiano, for copies of the questionnaire."

Please follow the link for Frances Gaudiano's phone and email details:

EXTERNAL LINK
They can email you a copy of the survey. All you have to do is print it off, fill it in (by hand) (one per dog) and post it back to them.

Cheers,

Mel


Claire Brand
United Kingdom
(Verified User)
Posts 429
Dogs 10 / Races 0

13 Oct 2006 09:09


 (0)
 (0)


Hi Mel,

I've filled in a load of these for all the ex-racers I've come into contact with. I used to think that it was more prevalent while they were racing and on a higher protein diet, but some retired racers that lie about on cushions all day in a house and eat ~19% protein still have it so it could well be a hereditary thing. We are lucky that for genetic studies we have all the pedigrees in Greyhound Data - having been a human clinical molecular geneticist for many years it was always very frustrating not to have much pedigree information. So the more of these forms they get back the better.

As an aside I've been using something called Quistel on one of my dogs who was quite scurfy and had a bald bit on his tail where he sat on it. Its not cheap but it has done the trick.


John Spracklen
Ireland
(Verified User)
Posts 1509
Dogs 0 / Races 0

13 Oct 2006 12:17


 (0)
 (0)


Mornin Claire,

Very interested in 'Quistel' but my vet doesnt stock it and hasnt heard of it, who are the manufacturers please?


John Spracklen
Ireland
(Verified User)
Posts 1509
Dogs 0 / Races 0

13 Oct 2006 13:51


 (0)
 (0)


Alright Claire, I found it, thanks anyway.


Mel Fraser
Ireland
(Verified User)
Posts 170
Dogs 1 / Races 0

13 Oct 2006 23:10


 (0)
 (0)


That's great Claire.

As you say, the more the better. It would be interesting to know what conclusions they eventually reach, if any.


Susan Breininger
USA
(Verified User)
Posts 2752
Dogs 0 / Races 0

14 Oct 2006 02:25


 (0)
 (0)


Ah, you Brits - you get all the good stuff! First the Easi-Scoop and now Quistel!! Neither seems to be available here! Do you use the shampoo, lotion or both, Claire? Do you know of any equivilent product?


Claire Brand
United Kingdom
(Verified User)
Posts 429
Dogs 10 / Races 0

14 Oct 2006 09:12


 (0)
 (0)


Hi John - sorry I didn't get back to you - had a bad Friday 13th yesterday. Was on my way back from John O'Connors the greyhound vet at Ockendon with Stamford and just coming off the Dartford Bridge an articulated lorry ran into me - fortunately Stamford and me are fine - the car's not too happy though!

Susan - I used the shampoo initially - mainly because I got a free sample of it - and that got rid of the worst of it - now I just spray the lotion on ~once or twice a week.

The Quistel does promote hair growth and has antiseptic properties - as would many aromatherapy oils.

Obvioulsy I put cod liver oil in the food too - Ebony looks so good now he won a dog show!

Shaws do a tea tree oil spray too which you might be able to get hold of.

Failing that try making a mix of aromatherpy oils with tea tree, lavender, etc - thats advice I got from Ken Duce's mum Anne - shes great at getting a dogs coat right. You could mix it in water and spray it on or use an aromatherpy carrier oil like Almond Oil to mix it in for tougher cases and rub it in to the skin. You would be able to get all that sort of stuff from a pharmacy or health food type shop.

Makes them smell nice too!!!!


Marion Wright
United Kingdom
(Verified User)
Posts 2893
Dogs 10 / Races 4

14 Oct 2006 14:25


 (0)
 (0)


Claire, Sorry to hear about your accident, But most of all that you and Stamford are OK. Bet that shook you up a bit. Those lorries are so huge they need extra space to turn. I know from experience those lorries need a very large turn and if they don't get it they just plough into any vehicle in they way. Really glad you and dogs are OK. Marion


Mike Tucker
Australia
(Verified User)
Posts 40
Dogs 179 / Races 1

14 Oct 2006 18:02


 (0)
 (0)


we have got a few ex racers for breeding over the last year and most of these have had hair loss on their thighs and chest. Most people say its a Thyroid problem. Anyway an older gentelman in the sport made mention of a cheap additive to sprinkle on their meal ( small teaspoon )Within 2 weeks the hair loss was gone and hasnt looked like coming back. Havent checked their thyroid levels before and after, but the hair loss is gone . I was worried initially as it was stated that some studmasters were taking thyroid levels of broods before matings and if they were not up to scratch, wouldnt let the mating go on.We should have taken before and after photos as the result of the last bitch was amazing. She had totally bald thighs and now is fully 'haired up'.




Carole Brown
Australia
(Verified User)
Posts 31517
Dogs 173 / Races 2

14 Oct 2006 18:09


 (0)
 (0)


Hi Michael, Are you going to let us in on the secret or are you just going to tease us ? We have tried thyroid tablets on many dogs over the years, and to be very honest, we only ever had any results with one dog. The rest were a waste of time and money. You see plenty of dogs winning races with bald thighs. Best wishes, Carole.


Mike Tucker
Australia
(Verified User)
Posts 40
Dogs 179 / Races 1

14 Oct 2006 23:25


 (0)
 (0)


You would probably laugh at what it is Carole, and its not the 'small teaspoon' which it reads as to be LOL.
And the gentleman wasnt really that old, just been in dogs for many years and picked the tip from an older trainer when he was younger.Its ................... iodised salt which you can get at any Supermarket.


Carole Brown
Australia
(Verified User)
Posts 31517
Dogs 173 / Races 2

15 Oct 2006 03:22


 (0)
 (0)


Hi Michael, It is funny you should mention iodised salt. We use it and I was just telling someone in Queensland about that this week, who was having trouble with thyroid levels in his dog and not getting any results from thyroxine tablets. Must work ok !!! Best wishes, Carole.


Richard Whitley
Ireland
(Verified User)
Posts 4
Dogs 0 / Races 0

08 Jan 2011 22:11


 (0)
 (0)


John,wondering where one can get Quistel

Thanks
Richard


Richard Whitley
Ireland
(Verified User)
Posts 4
Dogs 0 / Races 0

08 Jan 2011 22:36


 (0)
 (0)


Hi Carole,

My dog has 2-4 sores/lumps on his tail, he does have a small bald patch on one thigh. Is it advisable to get him tested for hypothyroidism?

Or, are there any known causes for the sores?

Thanks
Richard


Carole Brown
Australia
(Verified User)
Posts 31517
Dogs 173 / Races 2

09 Jan 2011 02:27


 (0)
 (0)


Richard, are the sores/lumps on the actual bony joints of his tail ? If they are, he may be sitting or lying hard up against his kennel wall and rubbing that part of his tail on the wall. This would cause sores, as there is not much covering on these joints.


Lotte Orum
Ireland
(Verified User)
Posts 363
Dogs 21 / Races 1

09 Jan 2011 20:17


 (0)
 (0)


Mike Tucker wrote:

You would probably laugh at what it is Carole, and its not the 'small teaspoon' which it reads as to be LOL.
And the gentleman wasnt really that old, just been in dogs for many years and picked the tip from an older trainer when he was younger.Its ................... iodised salt which you can get at any Supermarket.


Salt is not the factor - its the iodine that does the trick. Try Kelp (sea weed) instead as salt does make dogs puke and dehydrate.




Jack Ogilvie
Australia
(Verified User)
Posts 13777
Dogs 0 / Races 1

09 Jan 2011 21:23


 (0)
 (0)


I put a friend of mines dog on deep sea kelp 6 years ago he had a Thyroid problem ,this dog was also a cramper.It fixed both of his problems. Deep sea kelp is also a good source of calcium,Magnesium,and is a very good anti oxidant.Iodised salt does have Potassium,and iodine in it, where ordinary salt does not.



Keith Lloyd
Australia
(Verified User)
Posts 1316
Dogs 54 / Races 3

09 Jan 2011 22:06


 (0)
 (0)


I give mine Potassium Chloride 4 days a week and Kelp 2 days a week, never on the same day.
Does anyone know the difference between Potassium Chloride and Potassium Citrate??



Jack Ogilvie
Australia
(Verified User)
Posts 13777
Dogs 0 / Races 1

09 Jan 2011 22:18


 (0)
 (0)


CLICK HERE Keith you be the judge IMHO trainers use far to much Potassium.


James Saunders
Australia
(Verified User)
Posts 2424
Dogs 2 / Races 1

09 Jan 2011 22:23


 (0)
 (0)


get a full blood test and than you get an idea of that particular dogs diet requirements.its in black and white and you can address them ,please dont guess what your dog needs.

posts 33page  1 2